PROVERBS

proverb (from Latin: proverbium) is a simple and concrete saying, popularly known and repeated, that expresses a truth based on common sense or the practical experience of humanity. They are often metaphorical. A proverb that describes a basic rule of conduct may also be known as a maxim.

Proverbs are often borrowed from similar languages and cultures, and sometimes come down to the present through more than one language. Both the Bible (including, but not limited to the Book of Proverbs) and medieval Latin (aided by the work of Erasmus) have played a considerable role in distributing proverbs across Europe, although almost every culture has examples of its own.

  •  A bird in hand is worth two in the bush
  •  Drowning man catches at  straw
  • A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.
  • As the king, so are the subjects.
  • Barking dogs seldom bite
  • Birds of the same feather flock together.
  • Better be alone than in bad company
  • Casting pearls before swine
  • Cut your coat according to your cloth
  • Deep rivers move with silent majesty; shallow brooks are noisy.
  • Familiarity breeds contempt.
  • Fortune favors the brave.
  • God helps those who help themselves.
  • He who would catch fish must not mind getting wet.
  • Handsome is that handsome does.
  • Honesty is the best policy.
  • Hope for the best and be prepared for the worst.
  • Man proposes, God disposes.
  • No pins, no gains.
  • Necessity is the mother of invention.
  • Out of the trying pan into the fire.
  • Penny-wise and pound foolish
  • Practice makes a man perfect.
  • Prevention is better than cure
  • Something is better than nothing.
  • Strike the iron while it is hot.
  • A stitch in time saves nine.
  • The wearer knows where the shoe pinches.
  • Time and tide wait for none.
  • To make a mountain out of a mole hill.
  • To many cooks spoil the broth.
  • Truth is always bitter.
  • Well begun is half done.
  • Where there is  a will, there is a way.
  • An empty vessels sounds much.